What does the PPD rating mean?

By: Zack Hendon | Posted on: December 3, 2015 9:00 am

Question from Public:

What exactly does that mean and how is that compensated through workers’ comp? I don’t understand what these ratings mean and is there a compensation for it? This was not done by my doctor but I was sent by WC to an outside source. Is this something I should worry about and is there a payment due because of these rating?

Comment by Attorney Zack Hendon:

Georgia workers’ compensation laws provide for only three benefits.  These are (1) medical expenses without a deductible, (2) indemnity benefits for lost time and (3) a permanent partial disability rating.  Out of these three the disability rating is usually of the lowest value of these three benefits.  Not only is it of the lowest value, it is paid after the lost time benefits have finished being paid out.  The rating is supposed to be done or agreed to by the authorized treating physician.

O.C.G.A. 34-9-263 © and (d) provides:

(c)  Schedule of income benefits. Subject to the maximum and minimum limitations on weekly income benefits specified in Code Section 34-9-261, the employer shall pay weekly income benefits equal to two-thirds of the employee’s average weekly wage for the number of weeks determined by the percentage of bodily loss or loss of use times the maximum weeks as follows:
Bodily Loss                                               Maximum Weeks
(1) Arm………………………………………………………225
(2) Leg……………………………………………………….225
(3) Hand…………………………………………………….160
(4) Foot………………………………………………………135
(5) Thumb………………………………………………….. 60
(6) Index finger…………………………………………… 40
(7) Middle finger…………………………………………. 35
(8) Ring finger…………………………………………….. 30
(9) Little finger……………………………………………. 25
(10) Great toe…………………………………………….. 30
(11) Any toe other than the great toe……………. 20
(12) Loss of hearing, traumatic
One ear…………………………………………………. 75
Both ears……………………………………………….150
(13) Loss of vision of one eye………………………..150
(14) Disability to the body as a whole……………..300

(d)  Impairment ratings. In all cases arising under this chapter, any percentage of disability or bodily loss ratings shall be based upon Guides to the Evaluation of Permanent Impairment, fifth edition, published by the American Medical Association.

So if you had a back injury which is considered a whole body rating, the rating would be based on 300 weeks as shown in the above chart.  If the doctor said the injury worker had a 10% whole body rating, then 10% would be multiplied by the 300 weeks to give the injured worker an extra 30 weeks of benefits to be paid out after the other income benefits have stopped.  I would not be as concerned with the rating as what that other doctor said in his report.

If you have any further questions concerning workers’ compensation, car or truck wrecks, call Attorney Zack Hendon directly at 770-284-3737.